Index Diachronica v.6.1

allthingslinguistic:

tumblinguists:

A collection of historical sound changes that I curate. Feedback and (cited) submissions are encouraged.

So I just got this link in my inbox as a submission, and Oh My Gheg, I am in pure awe of this masterpiece.

Historical linguists, especially those of PhoPho leanings, look at this. Just behold.

Thank you, man-in-space!

It would be interesting to compile this data to see which of these changes are more and less common. Some, like palatalization, voicing assimilation, and homorganic nasal assimilation, should be really common, but it would be interesting to see if other trends would emerge. Anyone know if someone’s done this?

art-of-swords:

Japanese Sword

  • Dated: 19th century
  • Measurements: overall length 42 inches

The sword features a scabbard with floral, figures, and animal motifs across the sword and handle. The blade features carved Chinese characters.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Altair Auctions & Appraisals

Me and my Blogs…

Tagged by elbywoggit

Name: Annie

Age: 40

Birthday: 18 December

Gender: Female

Sexuality: Straight.

Height: 5’3

Blogs: this one, The Adventures of Cailean and Talos, my art blog An Eighth Shot of Espresso, my regular tumblr blog Mama Java’s

It’s messing people up, this social pressure to “find your passion” and “know what it is you want to do”. It’s perfectly fine to just live your moments fully, and marvel as many small and large passions, many small and large purposes enter and leave your life. For many people there is no realization, no bliss to follow, no discovery of your life’s purpose. This isn’t sad, it’s just the way things are. Stop trying to find the forest and just enjoy the trees.

http://specialedoriginality.tumblr.com/post/92762255488/s-so-cold-she-muttered-against-her-gloved-hands

specialedoriginality:

"S-So cold." She muttered against her gloved hands as she brought them up to her mouth to breathe on them.

The Kiliks had informed her that the path Vector had last been seen would soon be covered by snow with the winter months coming and she had mindlessly gathered whatever heavy gear she…

cupcakelogic:

We had no power and wifi for like a week because of a typhoon so to save myself from boredom I drew this then forgot about it so here have a lazily drawn Anakin and his children.

cupcakelogic:

We had no power and wifi for like a week because of a typhoon so to save myself from boredom I drew this then forgot about it so here have a lazily drawn Anakin and his children.

ancientpeoples:

Colossal marble head of Asklepios
Greek
c. 325-300 BCFound on Mílos, Southern Aegean, Greece
The healing god
This head comes from a colossal statue of the god Asklepios, a god of medicine and healing. It was constructed from three separately worked pieces, of which two survive. The calm expression of the face is set off by a full beard and crown of hair. The lead pegs that would have held a gold wreath are still in place, but the wreath is now lost.
The cult of Asklepios was popular throughout Greece and Asia Minor during the Classical period (480-300 BC) and the Hellenistic period (323-30 BC). Important centres were set up in Athens and at Epidaurus in the Peloponnese. Hippocrates was the founding father of modern scientific medicine and, following his death in 357 BC, a healing sanctuary was established on his native island of Cos. There, Asklepios was represented in what became the canonical manner of the later Hellenistic and Roman periods: bearded, semi-nude and supported on one side by a staff around which a serpent is coiled. This head probably comes from such a statue.
Source: British Museum

ancientpeoples:

Colossal marble head of Asklepios

Greek

c. 325-300 BC
Found on Mílos, Southern Aegean, Greece

The healing god

This head comes from a colossal statue of the god Asklepios, a god of medicine and healing. It was constructed from three separately worked pieces, of which two survive. The calm expression of the face is set off by a full beard and crown of hair. The lead pegs that would have held a gold wreath are still in place, but the wreath is now lost.

The cult of Asklepios was popular throughout Greece and Asia Minor during the Classical period (480-300 BC) and the Hellenistic period (323-30 BC). Important centres were set up in Athens and at Epidaurus in the Peloponnese. Hippocrates was the founding father of modern scientific medicine and, following his death in 357 BC, a healing sanctuary was established on his native island of Cos. There, Asklepios was represented in what became the canonical manner of the later Hellenistic and Roman periods: bearded, semi-nude and supported on one side by a staff around which a serpent is coiled. This head probably comes from such a statue.

Source: British Museum