40 Questions — Meme for Fic Writers

rointheta:

  1. Describe your comfort zone—a typical you-fic.
  2. Is there a trope you’ve yet to try your hand at, but really want to?
  3. Is there a trope you wouldn’t touch with a ten foot pole?
  4. How many fic ideas are you nurturing right now? Care to share one of them?
  5. Share one of your strengths.

If wealth was the inevitable result of hard work and enterprise, every woman in Africa would be a millionaire.

George Monbiot (via azzydarling)

agoestocollege:

As a student of both Greek and Latin, learning vocabulary is my own personal hell. It takes me a lot of time to memorize the lessons’ vocabulary and I normally forget them by the next week. Sometimes I even mix them up, like I’m doing Latin words in Greek alphabet and so on. 
I had to make a system that would help me with this and now that I’m revising for the upcoming semester, I thought that I’d share it with you. 
General tips


Practice saying new words out loud (or writing them). 




Study vocabulary several times a day for 5-10 minutes at a time.




When learning vocabulary, practice conjugating new verbs or declining new nouns and adjectives. 




Don’t panic. Language learning is a cumulative process.




Don’t study for several hours in a row without a break. You’ll go nuts, and it will be less likely to become part of your long-term memory.




Don’t be a passive learner. If you use all your senses, if you use the language to create new sentences, you will learn it better.




Don’t study vocab for more than 15 minutes at a time, preferably no more than 10 minutes at a time.




Don’t leave the vocabulary for the day before a test. You will feel overwhelmed and you will not be able to memorize everything you need.




Find the best place to write. One of my friends prefers to write on paper but I have a little board where I can write with really big letters and different colours. I find it that it visually helps me a lot. 


My method.

I always start by classing the words in different columns (adjectives, verbs, substantives, invariables words, prepositions, etc) and following the alphabet order. 
I write each word at least 10 times from Greek or Latin to French and then 10 times from French to Greek or Latin… Because French is not my mother language I make sure that I understand 100% the word I’m studying. My teacher from last year loved to use a lot of synonyms and it was terrible for me because sometimes I couldn’t find the word he wanted us to use. (Mr. P. I still hate you).
Help yourself with etymology. Most of the words in French (and luckily for me in Spanish) come from both Latin and Greek so I always try to find the connection. For example, the Spanish word “avaricia” comes from the word “avaritia” in Latin… But be really careful with the faux amis.  
Test yourself. I normally study 10 words and then I rewrite them with their meaning without making any mistakes. If I get to do this three times in a row then I consider it done.
Make flashcards. This helps me a lot to revise because it’s not as tedious as rewriting them. I have an app on my phone called Flashcards+ and it’s an amazing tool for reviewing vocabulary when I’m taking the subway or waiting for the bus. I only use flashcards to revise the words I already know.
Revise from time to time all the vocabulary you have learnt. You’re going to forget words so it’s really helpful if you at least read them.
Make a list of the words you always forget and study those before a test.

Well, that’s it. If you have any other suggestion, be sure to tell me!
PS: English is not my mother language either so I’m really sorry if there’s any mistake. 

agoestocollege:

As a student of both Greek and Latin, learning vocabulary is my own personal hell. It takes me a lot of time to memorize the lessons’ vocabulary and I normally forget them by the next week. Sometimes I even mix them up, like I’m doing Latin words in Greek alphabet and so on.

I had to make a system that would help me with this and now that I’m revising for the upcoming semester, I thought that I’d share it with you.

General tips

  • Practice saying new words out loud (or writing them).
  • Study vocabulary several times a day for 5-10 minutes at a time.
  • When learning vocabulary, practice conjugating new verbs or declining new nouns and adjectives.
  • Don’t panic. Language learning is a cumulative process.
  • Don’t study for several hours in a row without a break. You’ll go nuts, and it will be less likely to become part of your long-term memory.
  • Don’t be a passive learner. If you use all your senses, if you use the language to create new sentences, you will learn it better.
  • Don’t study vocab for more than 15 minutes at a time, preferably no more than 10 minutes at a time.
  • Don’t leave the vocabulary for the day before a test. You will feel overwhelmed and you will not be able to memorize everything you need.
  • Find the best place to write. One of my friends prefers to write on paper but I have a little board where I can write with really big letters and different colours. I find it that it visually helps me a lot.

My method.

I always start by classing the words in different columns (adjectives, verbs, substantives, invariables words, prepositions, etc) and following the alphabet order.

  • I write each word at least 10 times from Greek or Latin to French and then 10 times from French to Greek or Latin… Because French is not my mother language I make sure that I understand 100% the word I’m studying. My teacher from last year loved to use a lot of synonyms and it was terrible for me because sometimes I couldn’t find the word he wanted us to use. (Mr. P. I still hate you).
  • Help yourself with etymology. Most of the words in French (and luckily for me in Spanish) come from both Latin and Greek so I always try to find the connection. For example, the Spanish word “avaricia” comes from the word “avaritia” in Latin… But be really careful with the faux amis.  
  • Test yourself. I normally study 10 words and then I rewrite them with their meaning without making any mistakes. If I get to do this three times in a row then I consider it done.
  • Make flashcards. This helps me a lot to revise because it’s not as tedious as rewriting them. I have an app on my phone called Flashcards+ and it’s an amazing tool for reviewing vocabulary when I’m taking the subway or waiting for the bus. I only use flashcards to revise the words I already know.
  • Revise from time to time all the vocabulary you have learnt. You’re going to forget words so it’s really helpful if you at least read them.
  • Make a list of the words you always forget and study those before a test.

Well, that’s it. If you have any other suggestion, be sure to tell me!

PS: English is not my mother language either so I’m really sorry if there’s any mistake. 

allthingslinguistic:

xkcd: Wikipedia article titles with the right syllable stress pattern to be sung to the tune of the original Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles theme song. (Here’s the song, for reference.)
All of these titles are examples of trochaic tetrameter, which is one of the most common English meters (a trochee is a foot consisting of STRONG-weak and tetrameter is four feet per line). Another example is Twinkle Twinkle Little Star, although that has a deficient last foot, but you can sing any of these titles to that tune as well if you just double the last note.
Trochaic tetrameter creates a strong feeling of sing-song “poem-ness” in English. Most Shakespearean characters, for example, speak in iambic pentameter (weak-STRONG, five feet per line), which sounds more natural, but a few speak in trochaic tetrameter for dramatic effect. For example, MacBeth and Lady MacBeth speak in iambic pentameter, which gives the effect of talking normally: 

Methought I heard a voice cry “Sleep no more!Macbeth does murder sleep,” the innocent sleep,Sleep that knits up the ravell’d sleave of care,
Out, damned spot! out, I say!—One: two: why,then, ‘tis time to do’t.—Hell is murky!—Fie, mylord, fie! a soldier, and afeard? What need wefear who knows it, when none can call our powerto account?—Yet who would have thought the oldman to have had so much blood in him?

But the witches speak in trochaic tetrameter, which makes them seem like they’re delivering an incantation: 

Double, double toil and trouble;Fire burn, and cauldron bubble.
Fair is foul, and foul is fair

Previous xkcd on poetry: metrical foot fetish, ballad meter, trochaic fixation. Language Log also has a long, interesting post on meter. 

allthingslinguistic:

xkcd: Wikipedia article titles with the right syllable stress pattern to be sung to the tune of the original Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles theme song. (Here’s the song, for reference.)

All of these titles are examples of trochaic tetrameter, which is one of the most common English meters (a trochee is a foot consisting of STRONG-weak and tetrameter is four feet per line). Another example is Twinkle Twinkle Little Star, although that has a deficient last foot, but you can sing any of these titles to that tune as well if you just double the last note.

Trochaic tetrameter creates a strong feeling of sing-song “poem-ness” in English. Most Shakespearean characters, for example, speak in iambic pentameter (weak-STRONG, five feet per line), which sounds more natural, but a few speak in trochaic tetrameter for dramatic effect. For example, MacBeth and Lady MacBeth speak in iambic pentameter, which gives the effect of talking normally: 

Methought I heard a voice cry “Sleep no more!
Macbeth does murder sleep,” the innocent sleep,
Sleep that knits up the ravell’d sleave of care,

Out, damned spot! out, I say!—One: two: why,
then, ‘tis time to do’t.—Hell is murky!—Fie, my
lord, fie! a soldier, and afeard? What need we
fear who knows it, when none can call our power
to account?—Yet who would have thought the old
man to have had so much blood in him?

But the witches speak in trochaic tetrameter, which makes them seem like they’re delivering an incantation: 

Double, double toil and trouble;
Fire burn, and cauldron bubble.

Fair is foul, and foul is fair

Previous xkcd on poetry: metrical foot fetish, ballad meter, trochaic fixation. Language Log also has a long, interesting post on meter

Okay, if the point of being a Jedi is to surpress all passion, fine. Okay. Sure, even Vulcans get to cut loose once every seven years, but I suppose having an insanely calm ruling class is probably good for the social order. You wanna live an ascetic monastic life? Hey, knock yourself out.

And so then the point of being a Sith is thus to let your passions run wild, draw strength from them, destroy your enemies, etc. Okay. Fine.

Then how come you go to a Sith academy and lo and behold, everybody’s got metal underwear and a single bed? (Yes, I looked.) You get beaten like a bloody flagellent and fed to starving monsters and tortured on weekends. You slog through your training, achieve a sufficiently high GPA, and get to be a Sith Lord, and what do you do? You stalk around on the bridge of your bigass starship, brooding, and glare out at empty space wishing you could bitch-slap the entire galaxy simultaneously. (They all do it. “Here’s your diploma, congratulations, here’s the keys to your star destroyer…”) They don’t even get a comfy easy chair to brood in. They all gotta stand up or else levitate in lotus position.

Do you get regular massages? No! Do you have legions of hot alien women waiting on you hand and foot? No! (You get one apprentice, who will always try to kill you, and will usually dress like a freak and wear too much eye makeup in the meantime.) Do you at least get good food? Possibly, but always off camera! Do you get to sleep in late? No, because other Sith will use the extra hours in the day to take your starship so that they can brood on it instead!

What’s the fun of giving in to your unbridled passions if they’re such LAME passions!? I mean my god! A pack of Catholic high school girls could cut looser than the Sith! If you’re going to be evil, why aren’t you people ever having any fun!?